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Healthy food habbits of Sri-Lanka

Nutritionists in the UAE say that elements of the Sri Lankan diet correspond with contemporary approaches to healthy eating. “With the ideal balance of food groups on one’s plate, Sri Lankan cuisine is promising for a healthy lifestyle,” says clinical dietitian Dr Remy Shanker, Wellness and Corporate Health Manager at Dubai-based catering company Right Bite.

“A typical traditional Sri Lankan plate is pescatarian based with a predominant plant-based approach. These coupled with good fats derived from coconuts and 100 per cent grass-fed cow/buffalo ghee are key to reducing inflammatory processes in the body and arriving at the ideal body fat percentage. What takes the cuisine to the next level is the conscious incorporation of their superlative spices.

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Corona Precautions Plan

Source: Pulse.lk

The surge and spread of COVID-19 taught many life lessons. Just to realise the good life you lived, feel happy about all the good deeds done and reflect on the uncertainty of life are invaluable. Take an effort to fill your life with wholesome activities, as you never know what could happen tomorrow. Also, do take the necessary precautions, to protect yourself, family and friends. Here’s a list of places that offer COVID-19 services, various helplines, and diagnostic tools accessible via smartphones, which are paving the way for a data-driven future of personalised care and medicine.

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Dengue Update

Total of 31162 suspected dengue cases for the year 2020 and 16906 suspected dengue cases were reported to the Epidemiology Unit from all over the island from January 2021 to up to now, . Latest Disease Trends,

Approximately 48.3 % of dengue cases were reported from the Western province. The highest numbers of dengue cases were reported during the 29th week of 2017.

The outbreak situation in 2017 warranted extensive and regular removal of possible mosquito breeding sites from the environment, along with strengthened patient education on management of fever which resulted in a relatively low mortality.

It is very important to seek medical attention in the event of fever and to do relevant laboratory investigations at least by day three of the illness.

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World Diabetes Day: Women and Diabetes

Source : Daily News

As the theme of the world diabetic day, we need to promote the importance of cost effective management of diabetes mellitus in Sri Lanka. This will highlight the importance of affordable and accessible diabetic care for women. All women at risk or living with diabetes need to have easy access to diabetes medicine, self-management education, and information they need to achieve optimal outcome and ability to prevent type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn’t make enough insulin. In the past three decades, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels.

The Primary Care Diabetic Group Sri Lanka was registered as a voluntary Social services/Non-Governmental Organization under Voluntary Social Services Organization Act No. 31 of 1980 as amended by Act No. 8 of 1998 on January 23, 2009. Its Head Office is at CeyMed, Stanley Thilakaratne Mawatha, Nugegoda. We do promote public education on Diabetes and render assistance to the needy patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

As the theme of the world diabetic day, we need to promote the importance of cost effective management of diabetes mellitus in Sri Lanka. This will highlight the importance of affordable and accessible diabetic care for women. All women at risk or living with diabetes need to have easy access to diabetes medicine, self-management education, and information they need to achieve optimal outcome and ability to prevent type 2 diabetes.

Key messages

All women with diabetes in Sri Lanka need to have easy access to diabetic care and health education to manage their diabetes and improve their health outcomes at an affordable price.

Currently there are over 199 million women living with diabetes in the world. This total is projected to increase to 300 million by 2040. The majority of this rise will affect the South Asian region of the world. Furthermore, two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide.

Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing over 2 million deaths annually and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus are 10 times more likely to develop ischemic heart disease than women without the condition.

Women with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of early miscarriage or having a baby with malformations.